Safety Matters Certified Training 4141 State Street, Suite E5 Santa Barbara, CA 93110 | Call: (805) 705-9222

HOW TO SAFELY DISPOSE OF MEDICATION

By Justin Haagen on Jun 09, 2021

HOW TO SAFELY DISPOSE OF MEDICATION

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Unwanted, unused or expired medications can become a major safety issue due to accidental poisoning, misuse and overdose. They can also harm the environment if they are not properly disposed.

The best way to discard unwanted or expired medication is to use a drug take back program.

USE A DRUG TAKE BACK LOCATION

Community kiosk drop-off sites allow patients to bring expired or unwanted medicines to convenient locations for proper disposal.  To find a location click here.

MEDICINE

ACCEPTED: Medications in any dosage form, except for those identified as Not Accepted below, in their original container or sealed bag.

NOT ACCEPTED: Herbal remedies, vitamins, supplements, cosmetics, other personal care products, medical devices, batteries, mercury-containing thermometers, sharps, and illicit drugs.

WHY WE NEED TO  PROPERLY DISPOSE OF MEDICATIONS

 

Prescription drugs are obtained in various ways. In some cases, unscrupulous pharmacists or other medical professionals either steal the drugs or sell fraudulent prescriptions. In a process known as doctor shopping, abusers visit several doctors to obtain multiple prescriptions. Individuals also call pharmacies with fraudulent pre-scription refills, or they alter prescriptions. Prescription drugs occasionally are stolen from pharmacies.

 

Young people typically obtain prescription drugs from peers, friends, or family members. Some individuals who have legitimate prescriptions sell or give away their drugs. Young people also acquire prescription drugs by stealing them from relatives and other individuals with legitimate prescriptions or from school medicine dispensaries.

 

Illegal Drug use in our community.

Nationally, 1.4 million people used prescription painkillers non-medically for the first time in the past year. The average age of these users was 21. Four out of five people who are addicted to heroin report that their addiction began with prescription pills. Despite the epidemic of opioid abuse in America, only 1 in 10 people with a substance use disorder receive treatment.  Every community is being impacted, and Santa Barbara is no exception. About once a week, someone in Santa Barbara County dies from an overdose involving opioids. Source: Santa Barbara Opioid Safety Coalition

 

To take an  ONLINE Opioid Overdose and Bystander Use of Naloxone course, visit us here .

 







Thank you, Justin, for an excellent training session for our Laguna Blanca faculty and staff. Your presentation was informative, responsive, enjoyable, and perfectly paced. You left no one behind and you answered every question clearly and effectively. Your teaching was outstanding.
Durward Brandis, Head of Middle School